An E11.5  in utero  electroporation of ChR2-EYFP into the mouse thalamus (imaged at P21), which I performed as part of a project during my PhD.

An E11.5 in utero electroporation of ChR2-EYFP into the mouse thalamus (imaged at P21), which I performed as part of a project during my PhD.

I am a neuroscientist interested in how thalamocortical and inhibitory circuits contribute to action, perception and prediction.

I received a BSc in Psychology from the University of Minho (Portugal), where I also studied for an MSc in Clinical Neuropsychology. I then moved to the University of Oxford for the Wellcome Trust PhD in Neuroscience programme, during which I worked with Simon Butt and Zoltan Molnar mapping interneuron, pyramidal and subplate circuits in the neonatal mouse brain. I continued this line of research during my first postdoc with Beatriz Rico at King's College London, albeit with a greater emphasis on molecular aspects.

During my time at Oxford, I had the good fortune of being exposed to the late great Ray Guillery. Ray was a regular at departmental seminars and Cortex Club talks. He had a distinctive and clear way of thinking about the brain, as well as a rare ability to glean functional insights from the systematic analysis of anatomical pathways. His writings ultimately inspired me to move into systems neuroscience and convinced me to place the thalamus and perception-action loops at the core of my thinking.

To fulfil this ambition, I moved to the Sainsbury-Wellcome Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour (UCL), concretely to Adam Kampff's team where I am currently a postdoc. In Adam's lab I am pursuing two lines of research: improving analysis and interpretation of activity recorded with high-density CMOS probes (Neuropixels) and using these very same probes combined with behaviour and optical imaging to understand the impact of high-order thalamic nuclei on cortical activity.

 

Parallel to scientific investigation of the brain, I am interested in how to leverage information technology and scientific community-spirit to improve the way we conduct, publish and replicate scientific research, making it more transparent, open and inclusive. My efforts towards these objectives have involved leading the  Oxford University Cortex Club and founding Neureka, a similar initiative at King's College London. With the help of Adam Kampff and my labmates, I am currently testing solutions to help scientists make sense of very large datasets through online collaboration.

 

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